Lesson 38: Dialogue in a Store While Buying Jewelry

This dialogue teaches you vocabulary to use in stores while buying things such as jewelry.


GREETINGS:

salām
hello
سَلام
chetor-ee
how are you?
چِطوری؟

Note: In Persian, as in many other languages, there is a formal and an informal way of speaking. We will be covering this in more detail in later lessons. For now, however, chetor-ee is the informal way of asking someone how they are, so it should only be used with people that you are familiar with. hālé shomā chetor-é is the formal expression for ‘how are you.’

Spelling note: In written Persian, words are not capitalized. For this reason, we do not capitalize Persian words written in phonetic English in the guides.


ANSWERS:

khoobam
I’m well
خوبَم

Pronunciation tip: kh is one of two unique sounds in the Persian language that is not used in the English language. It should be repeated daily until mastered, as it is essential to successfully speak Persian. Listen to the podcast for more information on how to make the sound.

Persian English
salām hello
chetor-ee how are you?
khoobam I’m well
merci thank you
khayli very
khayli khoobam I’m very well
khoob neestam I’m not well
man me/I
bad neestam I’m not bad
ālee great
chetor-een? how are you? (formal)
hālé shomā chetor-é? how are you? (formal)
hālet chetor-é? how are you? (informal)
khoob-ee? are you well? (informal)
mamnoonam thank you
chetor peesh meeré? how’s it going?
ché khabar? what’s the news? (what’s up?)
testeeeee

Leyla: Hello and welcome to yet another episode of Learn Persian with Chai and Conversation!

Matt: We’re so glad you’ve joined  us!

Leyla: A couple of big announcements before we get on with the program. First, our website is being completely redesigned from head to toe, and will be  launching soon

Matt: You can find that as always at www.chaiandconversation.com, with CHAI  spelled CHAI

Leyla: And we are adding to our Chai and Conversation learning system with some new exciting additions. We’re launching a new podcast soon-­‐ it will either  be  called  one  minute  Persian or three minute Persian, and it will consist of short weekly conversations that will help keep your conversational Persian fresh and your vocabulary growing.

Matt: In addition, we’ve heard from a lot of you that you would like to learn some about Persian script. I know I definitely do-­‐ we are adding a writing program to Chai and conversation soon as well.

Leyla: Stay tuned for more updates on that. If you’d like to be first to know about our website launch and new podcasts, please add us on facebook at www.facebook.com/learnpersian. There, you’ll be able to sign up for  our mailing list, and get the latest news about what we’re up  to.

Matt: If you don’t have facebook, send an email to leyla@chaiandconversation.com, and let her know you’d like to be part of the  mailing list!

Leyla: Or just send me an email saying hello. We love to hear from listeners, and would love to hear what you think of the program! Ok, apologies for the long intro, we’re just so excited about all the new changes coming up. And for now, Matt, are you ready to begin the program?

Matt: Ready!

Leyla: Great, then  let’s  begin  to  learn Persian with Chai and  Conversation.

 

Leyla: As you know, we are well into the our dialogue series. We heard a lot of suggestions from you, our listeners, about what kinds of dialogues you would like to learn about. One  popular suggestion  was  a  dialogue in a store that involves a transaction. So without further ado, let’s listen to a conversation between a woman wanting to buy a piece of jewelry-­‐ a common thing to buy in Iran, and a shopkeeper.

 

Mazerat meekham. Een dast band chande?

Een dastband see sad dolareh.

See sad dolar? Benazar zeeyad meeyad.

Khob, talayeh 22-­‐eh. Alan ghaymateh tala khayli balast.

Dorosteh, vali barayeh man khayli gerooneh. Cheezeh deegeyee nadareen?

Baleh. Een gardanband deeveest dolareh. Meebeeneen, een ham khayli zeebast.

Baleh. Vali een ham talayeh 22 hast?

Albateh.

Aha, baleh, een gardanband khayli ghashangeh.

Barayeh khodetoon meekhayn?

Na, barayeh dokhtaram. Hameen gardanband aaleeyeh. Befarmayeen, een ham deveest dolar naghd.

Albateh ghabeleh shoma ro nadareh.

Khahesh meekonam. Befarmayeen.

 

 

Leyla: Ok, so as we do every time with these dialogues, we are going to listen to  the conversation line by line together and figure out its meaning. First two lines:

 

Mazerat meekham. Een dast band chandeh? Een dastband see sad dolareh.

Leyla: Ok, so first the woman said ‘mazerat meekham’. This is a common phrase to get someone’s attention, whether in a store or anywhere. It means ‘excuse me’, and can be used in the same way. For example, if you bump into someone, you could also say ‘mazerat meekham.’ So let’s say it together-­‐ mazerat meekham

Matt: mazerat meekham

Leyla: Next she asks ‘een dast band chandeh’. We’ve learned the word ‘chandeh’ in Unit 2. It means how much is it. Chandeh

Matt: Chandeh

Leyla: The word dast band means bracelet. Dast band

Matt: Dast band

Leyla: This is another example of two words together  forming  one  concept.  Do you remember what the word dast means Matt?

Matt: It means hand

Leyla: That’s right. And the word band means something like bind. So dast band, something that binds the hand. Dast band.

Matt: dast band

Leyla: So put together, een dast band chandeh?

Matt: Een dast band chandeh?

Leyla: Or, how much is this bracelet. So the seller replies:

Een dastband see sad dolareh.

Leyla: So do we remember the number see sad Matt?

Matt: It means three hundred.

Leyla: That’s right. So see sad dolareh, it is three hundred dollars. Een dastband see  sad dolareh. So let’s listen to that again:

Mazerat meekham. Een dast band chandeh? Een dastband see sad dolareh.

 

Leyla: Great. Now moving on to the next two sentences:

See sad dolar? Benazar zeeyad meeyad.

 

Khob, talayeh 22-­‐eh. Alan ghaymateh tala khayli balast.

Leyla: The first sentence of this is easy-­‐ see sad dolar? What does this mean Matt?

Matt: three  hundred dollars?

Leyla: That’s right in question form. So she’s asking 300 dollars? See sad  dolar?

Matt: See sad dolar?

Leyla: And then she says ‘benazar zeeyad meeyad.’ So this full phrase means something along the lines of, it seems to be too much’. The word benazar broken down means to the mind. Be nazar-­‐ nazar means mind or opinion. Benazar

Matt: Benazar

Leyla: So to say in my opinion, you’d say benazaram

Matt: benazaram

Leyla: zeeyad of course means a lot or too much. Zeeyad

Matt: Zeeyad

Leyla: So benazar zeeyad meeyad

Matt: benazar  zeeyad meeyad.

Leyla: And like I said benazaram means in my opinion, so she could have said benazaram  zeeyad meeyad

Matt: benazaram  zeeyad meeyad

Leyla: Meaning in my opinion, it seems too much. Instead she said ‘benazar zeeyad meeyad’ which has the same meaning but is a bit more general. So more like ‘it seems too much in one’s opinion’ as opposed to it seems too much in my opinion. One more time ‘benazar  zeeyad meeyad

Matt: benazar zeeyad meeyad. So the seller replies:

Khob, talayeh 22-­‐eh. Alan ghaymateh tala khayli balast.

Leyla: Tala is a VERY important word in Persian-­‐ it means gold. Gold is very important in Iranian culture. Often, tala is given as a gift, because it’s seen as a gift that keeps on giving-­‐ not only can it be used for decoration, practically, but it also rises  in  value. So talayeh 22 means 22 carat gold. Iranians  very  seldom  buy  anything less than 22 carat gold, and often  have 24 carat. So he says ‘khob, talayeh 22-­‐eh’ saying Well, it is 22 carat gold. Khob, talayeh  22eh

Matt: Khob,  talayeh 22eh.

Leyla: He then goes on to say that

Alan ghaymateh tala khayli balast.

Leyla: To start, what does ‘alan’ mean?

Matt:  It means now

Leyla: So alan, ghaymateh tala khayli balaast. To know what this means, first we have to know the word ‘ghaymat’. It means ‘price’.  ghaymat

Matt: ghaymat

Leyla: And balaa means high or up. So alan ghaymateh tala khayli ballast-­‐ right now the price of gold is high. Alan ghaymateh tala khayli ballast

Matt: Alan ghaymateh tala khayli balaast Let’s listen to it again:

See sad dolar? Benazar zeeyad meeyad.

 

Khob, talayeh 22-­‐eh. Alan ghaymateh tala khayli balast.

 

Leyla: Ok, moving on to the next two sentences:

Dorosteh, vali barayeh man khayli gerooneh.

Baleh, meefahmam. Khob, een gardanband deeveest dolareh. Meebeeneen, een ham khayli zeebast.

Leyla: Ok so now she says ‘Dorosteh, vali barayeh man khayli gerooneh’

First, what does ‘dorosteh’ mean?

Matt: It means it’s right

Leyla: Exactly. Dorosteh Dorosteh and then ‘vali barayeh man khayli gerooneh.’ We learned the word geroon a long long time  ago. Remember Matt?

Matt: Yes, it means expensive.

Leyla: yes, geroon

Matt: geroon

Leyla: And just as a refresher, the word ‘arzoon’ means inexpensive.  Arzoon

Matt: Arzoon

Leyla: So vali barayeh man khayli gerooneh means ‘but for me, it’s very expensive.’ Vali barayeh  man

Matt: vali  barayeh man

Leyla: meaning but for me. Khayli gerooneh

Matt: khayli gerooneh

Leyla: It’s very expensive. So all together, vali barayeh man khayli  gerooneh

Matt: Vali barayeh man khayli  gerooneh.

Leyla: Then the shopkeeper says

Baleh, meefahmam. Khob, een gardanband deeveest dolareh. Meebeeneen, een ham khayli zeebast.”

Leyla: So first, ‘baleh meefahmam’. Meefahmam means I understand. Meefahmam

Matt: Meefahmam

Leyla: The next sentence is:

Khob, een gardanband deeveest dolareh.

Leyla: So the word dastband means bracelet-­‐ gardanband has the same ‘band’ word in it, but gardan means neck. So what do you supposed gardanband means Matt?

Matt: necklace?

Leyla: That’s right. So een gardanband deeveest dolareh-­‐ what does this mean Matt?

Matt: It means this necklace is 200  dollars

Leyla: That’s right! So ‘een gardanband deeveest dolareh’ Een gardanband deeveest  dolareh

Leyla: Then he says

 ‘Meebeeneen, een ham khayli zeebast.”

Leyla: Most of the words in there are familiar-­‐ what does zeeba mean Matt, we learned it in our Valentines episode

Matt: It  means beautiful

Leyla: that’s right. een ham khayli zeebast, means

Matt: This is also very beautiful

Leyla: That’s right. Een ham khayli zeebast een ham khayli zeebast

Leyla: That leaves the word ‘meebeeneen’. This means ‘you see’. Meebeeneen

Matt: Meebeeneen

Leyla: So meebeeneen, een ham khayli zeebast meebeeneen, een  Matt: ham  khayli zeebast.

Leyla: So you see, this is also very beautiful. Meebeeneen een ham  khayli zeebast

Matt: mebeeneeneen een ham khayli  zeebast.

Leyla: So let’s listen to those two sentences again:

Dorosteh, vali barayeh man khayli gerooneh.

 

Baleh, meefahmam. Khob, een gardanband deeveest dolareh. Meebeeneen, een ham khayli zeebast.

Leyla: Let’s take a quick break here and go over all the new words we’ve learned, and then we’ll go back and listen to the first half of the  conversation.

Mazerat meekham. Dast band

Gardan band Ghaymat Meebeeneen

Leyla: So as you can see, all of these sentences were constructed of words we already knew! So let’s listen to the first half of the conversation again and see if we can understand everything.

Mazerat meekham. Een dast band chande?

Een dastband see sad dolareh.

See sad dolar? Benazar zeeyad meeyad.

Khob, talayeh 22-­‐eh. Alan ghaymateh tala khayli balast.

Dorosteh, vali barayeh man khayli gerooneh. Cheezeh deegeyee nadareen?

Baleh. Een gardanband deeveest dolareh. Meebeeneen, een ham khayli zeebast.

Leyla: Great, now let’s listen to the next two lines.

Baleh. Vali een ham talayeh 22 hast?

Albateh.

Leyla: So the shopkeeper had shown a nice two hundered dollar necklace, and was telling the customer how beautiful it is. And she  replies:

Baleh. Vali een ham talayeh 22 hast?

Leyla: And you should know exactly what this means Matt.

Matt: It means yes, but is this also twenty two carat gold

Leyla: That’s right. Let’s repeat it ‘baleh, vali een ham talayeh 22 hast?’

Matt: Baleh, vali een ham talayeh 22 hast? Baleh, vali een ham talayeh 22  hast?

Leyla: And he replies ‘albateh’ which we’ve learned before means  ‘certainly’. Albateh

Matt: Albateh

Leyla: Next  two sentences:

Aha, baleh, een gardanband khayli ghashangeh. Barayeh khodetoon meekhayn?

Leyla: So first sentence extremely easy. Aha, baleh, een gardanband khayli ghashangeh. The sounds aha is used a lot, it means something like ‘Uh-­‐huh’. What does the rest of the sentence mean  Matt?

Matt: It means Yes, this necklace is very pretty.

Leyla: Yes, ghashang means beautiful or pretty. Ghashang

Matt: Ghashang

Leyla: It’s a little difficult to say. Baleh, een gardanband khayli ghashangeh.

Matt: Baleh, een gardanband khayli ghashangeh.

Leyla: So then the shopkeeper asks ‘barayeh khodetoon meekhayn?’ We haven’t learned the word khodetoon before. Khod means ‘self’ So khodetoon is the word for yourself,  formal. Khodetoon

Matt: khodetoon

Leyla: Let’s learn a few other iterations of self. Khodam is myself. khodam

Matt: Khodam

 

Leyla: Yourself informal is khodet

Matt: khodet

Leyla: him or herself informal is khodesh

Matt: khodesh

Leyla: Ourselves is khodemoon

Matt: khodemoon

Leyla: yourself formal, which we just heard, is khodetoon

 Matt: khodetoon

Leyla: and theirself, which we don’t have in English, but could also mean himself or herself in a formal sense is khodeshoon.

Matt: khodeshoon

Leyla: So hopefully you noticed that in this case, the third person also had a formal and informal form. If you’re talking about someone with whom you have an informal relationship, you  say khodesh

Matt: khodesh

Leyla: While if you’re talking about someone with whom you have a formal relationship, you say khodeshoon

Matt: khodeshoon

Leyla: This can also be used to refer to several people. Ok, so the original question was Barayeh khodetoon meekhayn? So this means ‘do you want it for yourself?’ Barayeh is the word for for and meekhayn is you want. So barayeh khodetoon  meekhayn

Barayeh khodetoon meekhayn Ok, next two sentences:

Na, barayeh dokhtaram. Hameen gardanband aaleeyeh. Befarmayeen, een ham deveest dolar naghd.

Albateh ghabeleh shoma ro nadareh.

Leyla: So the first thing she replies is “Na, barayeh dokhtaram.” This means ‘no, for my daughter.’ Na barayeh dokhtaram. 

Matt: Na barayeh dokhtaram. 

Next sentence:

Hameen gardanband aaleeyeh.

Leyla: The word hameen is a bit difficult to translate, it means ‘this’, but more like a particular ‘this’. Hameen gardanband aleeyeh, this particular necklace is great.

Hameen gardanband aleeyeh Hameen  gardanband aaleeyeh

Leyla: Then she says ‘befarmayeen, een ham deeveest dolar naghd.’ We’ve learned befarmayeen before-­‐ in the contexts we’ve learned it in before, it means something along the lines of go ahead. In this case, it means ‘here you  go’. Befarmayeen

Matt: befarmayeen

Leyla: Een ham deeveest dolar naghd. The word naghd means cash. Naghd

Matt: naghd

Leyla: So een ham deeveest dolar naghd means and this is 200 dollars cash. een ham deeveest dolar naghd

Matt: een ham deeveest nolar naghd

Leyla: And now the last two sentences: Albateh ghabeleh shoma ro nadareh.

 

Khahesh meekonam. Befarmayeen.

Leyla: So this first sentence represents one of the most important concepts in Iranian culture, tarof. If you’ve been listening to this podcast, you’ll have heard me talk about tarof many times. We’ve even made a video of it-­‐ it’s on youtube if you have a chance to check it out. So let’s listen to the first  sentence:

Albateh ghabeleh shoma ro nadareh.

Leyla: So in Iran, and in many Persian stores in the US, shopkeepers are obliged to say this. So tarof is the code  of etiquette  in  Iranian  culture  and  can  sometimes  be a bit extreme. In this case, ghabeleh shoma ro nadareh is a phrase that means ‘it is not worthy of you’. So, what the shopkeeper is trying to say with this phrase is that you   as a person are much more worthy than having to give money for an object. So he is saying you are worth more than the money, if that makes sense. In this way, he’s trying to be respectful of the shopper, to say that this  isn’t just a financial transaction. Bascially, he is refusing  to accept your money. Now, it is never ever the case   that he doesn’t actually want your money, so you have  to keep insisting that he takes it. It’s a very different system than in the US, so you just have to get used to it. So again, this phrase is ghabeleh shoma ro nadareh.

Matt: Ghabeleh shoma ro  nadareh

Leyla: And the word albateh we’ve learned before means ‘of course’ Albateh

Matt: Albateh

Leyla: albateh, ghabeleh shoma ro nadareh albateh ghabeleh shoma ro nadareh Great, so then she says

Khahesh meekonam. Befarmayeen.

Leyla: So khahesh meekonam we’ve learned before to mean you’re welcome. In this context, it means more like ‘no problem’ or ‘please’. Khahesh  meekonam

Matt: khahesh meekonam

Leyla: Literally it means ‘I ask of you’, and has many contexts in which  it’s used. So  khahesh meekonam

Matt: Khahesh meekonam

Leyla: And finally, the word befarmayeen, which we’ve learned so many times, and in this context means ‘please go ahead’.  Khahesh meekonam

Matt: Khahesh meekonam

Leyla: Ok, great. Let’s go over our latest tarof phrase one more time ‘ghabeleh shoma ro  nadareh’

Matt: ghabeleh shoma ro  nadareh

Leyla: And now let’s listen to the entire conversation one more time:

Mazerat meekham. Een dast band chande?

Een dastband see sad dolareh.

See sad dolar? Benazar zeeyad meeyad.

Khob, talayeh 22-­‐eh. Alan ghaymateh tala khayli balast.

Dorosteh, vali barayeh man khayli gerooneh. Cheezeh deegeyee nadareen?

Baleh. Een gardanband deeveest dolareh. Meebeeneen, een ham khayli zeebast.

Baleh. Vali een ham talayeh 22 hast?

Albateh.

Aha, baleh, een gardanband khayli ghashangeh.

Barayeh khodetoon meekhayn?

Na, barayeh dokhtaram. Hameen gardanband aaleeyeh. Befarmayeen, een ham deveest dolar naghd.

Albateh ghabeleh shoma ro nadareh.

Khahesh meekonam. Befarmayeen.

Mazerat meekham. Een dast band chande?

Een dastband see sad dolareh.

See sad dolar? Benazar zeeyad meeyad.

Khob, talayeh 22-­‐eh. Alan ghaymateh tala khayli balast.

Dorosteh, vali barayeh man khayli gerooneh. Cheezeh deegeyee nadareen?

Baleh. Een gardanband deeveest dolareh. Meebeeneen, een ham khayli zeebast.

Baleh. Vali een ham talayeh 22 hast?

Albateh.

Aha, baleh, een gardanband khayli ghashangeh.

Barayeh khodetoon meekhayn?

Na, barayeh dokhtaram. Hameen gardanband aaleeyeh. Befarmayeen, een ham deveest dolar naghd.

Albateh ghabeleh shoma ro nadareh.

Leyla: And that brings us to the end of lesson 38!

Leyla: Thank you so much for joining us for yet another episode of Chai and  Conversation!

Matt: Only two more dialogues left to  go.

Leyla: As always, listen to the previous episodes on our website  at www.chaiandconversation.com

Matt: And be sure to check out bonus materials for this lesson, which include all the dialogues such that you can listen   to them line by line.

Leyla: Well… khodahafez for now, from leyla and ta dafeyeh baad, Matt: from  matt!